Academics

 

The Department of History offers various degrees and programs for both undergraduate and graduate students, including a Bachelor of Arts, Master of Arts and PhD.

Fall 2016 Courses

button for Courses in History, Fall 2016
CRN Course Title instructor bldg/rm date/time
Undergraduate Courses
77046 HIST 1000.10 Medieval Mediterranean Suzanne Miller PHIL 328 M 11:10AM - 1:00PM
Is the sea a natural barrier, or is it a vector for exchange? Can it be both? Europeans, North Africans and Middle Easterners are still grappling with this paradox today as migration, warfare and trade occur across and through the Mediterranean Sea. The origins of this modern dynamic emerged in the Middle Ages, with the break-up of the Roman Empire. Pilgrimage and Crusade, Piracy and Trade, all of these medieval phenomena help us explore the dynamism of diverse worlds colliding in a time before globalism.  See syllabus
72485 HIST 1011.10 World History, 1500-Present Benjamin Hopkins 1957 E 113 TR 11:10AM - 12:25PM
World History covers human development on a world scale from the age of Columbus and Vasco da Gama to the present. Issues discussed include globalization, industrialization and the rise and fall of Empires. We will also examine the impact of these processes on the lives of ordinary people. See Syllabus
72487 HIST 1011.11 World History, 1500-Present Paula Alonso-Gortari FNGR 103 TR
11:10AM - 12:25PM
World History covers human development on a world scale from the age of Columbus and Vasco da Gama to the present. Issues discussed include globalization, industrialization and the rise and fall of Empires. We will also examine the impact of these processes on the lives of ordinary people.  
77047 HIST 1011.12 World History, 1500-Present William Burns MON 353 TR 9:35AM - 10:50AM
World History covers human development on a world scale from the age of Columbus and Vasco da Gama to the present. Issues discussed include globalization, industrialization and the rise and fall of Empires. We will also examine the impact of these processes on the lives of ordinary people. See syllabus
74041 HIST 1310.MV Introduction to American History Jennifer Bertolet AMES B207 TR 11:30AM - 12:45PM
This course introduces students to the social, cultural, political, and economic history of what is now the United States from pre-contact Indian America through Reconstruction. The topics covered include exploration, colonization, Native Americans, slavery, the American Revolution, expansion, industrialization, immigration, the Civil War, emancipation, and Reconstruction. Lectures, readings, and discussions will provide students with historical facts, but will emphasize issues, trends, and forces that resonate today. See syllabus
75562 HIST 1310.MV1 Introduction to American History Jennifer Bertolet AMES B205 TR
01:00PM - 02:15PM
This course introduces students to the social, cultural, political, and economic history of what is now the United States from pre-contact Indian America through Reconstruction. The topics covered include exploration, colonization, Native Americans, slavery, the American Revolution, expansion, industrialization, immigration, the Civil War, emancipation, and Reconstruction. Lectures, readings, and discussions will provide students with historical facts, but will emphasize issues, trends, and forces that resonate today. See syllabus
75440 HIST 1311.10 Introduction to American History Richard Stott 1957 E 213 TR
09:35AM - 10:50AM
This course introduces students to the social, cultural, political, and economic history of what is now the United States from pre-contact Indian America through Reconstruction. The topics covered include exploration, colonization, Native Americans, slavery, the American Revolution, expansion, industrialization, immigration, the Civil War, emancipation, and Reconstruction. Lectures, readings, and discussions will provide students with historical facts, but will emphasize issues, trends, and forces that resonate today.  
76125 HIST 2011.80 Modern American Cultural History Joseph Kip Kosek FNGR 103 TR
09:35AM - 10:25AM

The effects of culture in the shaping of the United States since 1876. The role of the mass media; effects of cultural conceptions on the physical landscape; changing ideas of race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality; and the political meanings of cultural conflict. Transnational influences on U.S. culture and effects of U.S. culture abroad. Same as AMST 2011.

 
74163 HIST 2020W.80 Washington, D.C.: History, Culture, and Politics Christopher Klemek ROME B104 M 11:10AM - 1:00PM
"Washington, DC: History, Culture, and Politics" is a unique service learning course (in partnership Gelman Special Collections, the GW Museum and the Nashman Center for Civic Engagement) that entails independent archival research and culminates with public presentations and online publication of original student projects on the DigitalDC Community History Project. Fulfills the following GPAC requirements: analysis; humanities; local/civic engagement (perspective); WID; Group B for History majors. For more information, visit: gwtoday.gwu.edu/digitaldc-brings-washington-alive-click-mouse See syllabus
73957 HIST 2113.80 The Roman World to 337 A.D. Andrew Smith 1957 E B12 TR
12:45PM - 02:00PM
Prehistoric Italy; rise and decline of the Roman Empire and Latin civilization; cultural, social, and political developments in the Greek world under Roman rule. Same as CLAS 2113.  
77541 HIST 2160.10 History of Germany John Garratt DUQUES 362 TR
11:10AM - 12:25P
This course covers the political, social, and cultural development of Germany.  
75563 HIST 2305W.10 Abraham Lincoln Tyler Anbinder PHIL 329 W 1:00PM - 3:00PM
The goals of this class are to give students a thorough understanding of the life and times of Abraham Lincoln, one of our most beloved and important presidents, and to help History majors significantly improve their writing skills through numerous analytical writing assignments. We start with Lincoln's youth and end with his assassination, with a focus on his years as president. See syllabus
77041 HIST 2322.10 U.S. History since 1945 Phil Muehlenbeck MON 110 MW 4:45PM - 6:00PM
This course serves as an introduction to the history of the United States from 1945 to 2000 emphasizing the formation of American character traits. The course provides a topical and thematic approach to post-1945 United States history, including Cold War politics and culture; national security and imperialism in American foreign policy; the fate of liberalism and the rise of conservatism; social movements of the Left and the Right; the relationships between mass consumer culture, countercultures and youth subcultures; and the era of globalization and its discontents. The course explores issues of American national identity and the changing boundaries of American citizenship with emphasis on the intersection of politics, culture, and society in modern U.S. history. The course also seeks to help students develop analytical skills important to the discipline of history, including the ability to collect and analyze evidence, differentiate between primary and secondary sources, and construct arguments in oral and written presentation. See syllabus
71984 HIST 2340W.10 US Diplomatic History Gregg Brazinsky 1957 E 113 TR
02:20PM - 03:35PM
American foreign relations in the 20th century.  
77068 HIST 2380.80 Sexuality in US Cultural History Chad Heap MPA 310 MW
03:45PM - 04:35PM
Examination of the changing social organization and meaning of sexual practices and desires in American culture, with particular attention to the relationship between sexuality and gendered racial and class identities and politics. Same as AMST 2380/ WSTU 2380.  
74595 HIST 2410.80 20th-Century US Immigration Thomas Guglielmo 1957 E B17 TR
02:20PM - 03:10PM
Survey of immigration policy and immigrants’ lives. How immigrants have changed the United States and how the United States has changed immigrants. Same as AMST 2410.  
75481 HIST 2440.80 The American City Suleiman Osman DUQUES 151 TR
11:10AM - 12:00PM
An interdisciplinary introduction to the ethnic, cultural, political, and architectural landscape of the American city. Urban theory, race and ethnicity, urban history, planning and architecture, city politics, and cultural representations of the city. Same as AMST 2440.  
72816 HIST 3001.10 History of US Counterintelligence Raymond Batvinis GOV 102 TR 9:35AM -10:50AM
The course examines the Federal Bureau of Investigation's national security role since its formation in 1908. It traces the Bureau's counterintelligence experiences as function of statecraft in the context of the many domestic and international upheavals which have impacted the United States over the last century.  
74733 HIST 3001.11 Digital History Diane Cline 1957 E 111 M 3:30PM - 6:00PM
This course explores the new world historians are co-creating in the Digital Age, and will teach you practical tools for improving your papers, building your own historical projects, creating your own maps and learning how to analyze and present data in visual forms. Through a mix of theory (reading) and practice (doing) you will understand how digitization is revolutionizing the field of history, and the humanities and social sciences more broadly. We look at how to use, build, and evaluate historical archives on the Internet, bearing in mind that every website we visit or use was created by people like you and me. We hear directly about the experiences of such website designers. we also do some digital transcribing to help digitize the Smithsonian Institution's field notebooks. This course uses experiential learning through field trips, guest speakers, and hands on computer exercises. At the end of the semester we put on a Digital Humanities "Un-conference" for the D.C. community, making it a service-learning course. No prerequisite computer skills are needed, just curiosity and open mindedness for what the future of the field of History might be, and how you can contribute! See syllabus
73961 HIST 3001.12 War Crimes Trials Jeffrey Richter 2020 K 27 MW
04:45PM - 06:00PM
Special Topics  
74330 HIST 3001.13 World of Late Antiquity: 300-750  Jonathan Shea ROME 352 TR
09:35AM - 10:50AM
This course will cover the history of Europe and the Near East from 300-750. We will see the Roman Empire collapse, and a new political order rise to replace it. We will examine the lives and beliefs of the inhabitants of this world, and how they changed during a time of social and political upheaval. Finally the course will explore how Christianity became established as a major world religion, and witness the birth of Islam, and the first flowering of Muslim culture. See syllabus
77745 HIST 3001.14 Colonialism: Asia and Africa Shawn McHale PHIL 328 T
01:30PM - 03:20PM
Special Topics.  
77746 HIST 3001.15 History, Trauma, and Memory Shawn McHale 1957 E B14 T
11:10AM - 01:00PM
Special Topics.  
74603 HIST 3001.80 Prejudice on Trial Jenna Weissman Joselit 2142 G CONF W 12:30PM - 2:20PM
This seminar explores the public face of anti-Jewish prejudice by looking at a series of landmark trials and courtroom dramas in Europe, Israel and the United States from the 15th century through modern times. Drawing on court transcripts, propaganda films and eyewitness accounts, it examines the ways in which legal institutions promoted anti-Semitic beliefs and practices. See syllabus
77050 HIST 3039.10  Naval History 1815-2010 C. Thomas Long DUQUES 259 TR 12:45PM - 2:00PM
The pervasive importance of warfare in our culture is manifest not just in the political world, but also in our art, literature, music, and social structure. We will study causes, conduct, and consequences of an important, but often overlooked side of military history, the naval element from the American Civil War through conflicts in Asia such as the Russo-Japanese War to the era of Vietnam and beyond. The major research assignment will deal with the largest naval battle in history, the Battle of Leyte Gulf of October 1944. See syllabus
76399 HIST 3044W.10 The Price of Freedom: Normandy, 1944 C. Thomas Long GOV 101 TR 4:45PM - 6:00PM
This seminar explores the impact of modern warfare on individuals, families, communities and the world through the lens of D-Day and the Normandy Campaign of 1944. We explore the domestic and international political considerations, but focus on the role played by the young men and women who fought and died to liberate Europe and preserve western civilization. Each student will conduct research about and write a biography of an individual from his or her hometown who died in the campaign and then, during an eight-day “staff ride” tour of Normandy over spring break, present a eulogy for that person while standing at his or her graveside in the American Cemetery at Omaha Beach. The course, in addition to being a WiD, counts for the Oral Communication, Critical Analysis, and Global Perspective GPAC requirements. See syllabus
75490 HIST 3101.10  European Intellectual History post-1945 Andrew Zimmerman MON 353 MW 3:45PM - 5:00PM
This course traces perhaps the most important single intellectual outcome of the Second World War in social and political theory: the nature, meaning, and politics of being human after the Holocaust. This is a problem that remains central in contemporary European and American political thought, as well as in the academic humanities and social sciences. This course is as much an introduction to contemporary theory as it is a conventional history course, and the discussions and lectures will focus more on understanding and interpreting texts than on contextualizing them. See syllabus
75610 HIST 3101.11  Medieval Sex and Gender Suzanne Miller ROME 352 MW 2:20PM - 3:35PM
"Medieval" is a term we often use to put down beliefs and behaviors that we [or at least the American mainstream] find distasteful and uncivilized, especially when it comes to gender and sexuality. But what did medieval people REALLY think about female agency, gender fluidity and sex outside marriage? Study the minds and worlds of Peter Abelard, Ulrich von Liechtenstein, Christine de Pizan and Joan of Arc, and find out. You too will be able to school Dan Savage on what it really means to be "medieval." See syllabus
72275 HIST 3126.10 History of European Integration Sherrill Wells ROME 459 TR 12:45PM - 2:00PM
This course examines the political, economic, and diplomatic forces and events since the end of World War II that led to peace in Western Europe. It explores how, after centuries of wars, European politics were transformed by the incremental process of economic integration. It analyses the developments, institutions, and personalities that were the driving forces behind this gradual integration and examines them up to the present day.  
77058 HIST 3178.10 The Making of the Modern Balkans Hugh Agnew ROME 204 MW 12:45PM - 2:00PM
The Balkans have played a major role in recent history as the focus of international crises that led to military interventions. A century ago it was a Balkan conflict that began what we now call World War I. But the complex and fascinating history of this region includes much more than endless conflict! In this course we explore the historical forces that have shaped the present-day states and their peoples. We will certainly include the role of the region in international politics and of external powers in its history; but we will also consider the region from the inside out. See syllabus
77059 HIST 3301.10 Reading the American Novel as History Edward Berkowitz PHIL 329 T 11:10AM -1:00PM
The class reads and discusses a series of the best twentieth century novels in American literature. The instructor guides the discussions by talking about the authors' lives and the period in which they wrote. This year's selections include novels by Sinclair Lewis, Edith Wharton, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, John Updike and Saul Bellow. See syllabus
77060 HIST 3301.11 American Indian History to 1890 David Silverman FNGR 210 MW
02:20PM - 03:35PM
Topics in U.S. History.  
77061 HIST 3301.12  History of American Capitalism William Becker 2020 K 24 TR 3:45PM - 5:00PM
An examination of American capitalism as part of a mix of relationships among markets, politics, law, society, and culture over the span of the country’s history. Also considered are the deep global roots of American capitalism from its beginnings until the globalization of our time. By the end of the course students should have a greater understanding of American capitalism in a national and global context.  
77502 HIST 3301.13 Americans and their Environment Albert Beveridge BELL 309 TR
11:10AM - 12:25PM
Topics in U.S. History.  
76090 HIST 3301.80 The Culture of Civil Rights Ashley Brown ROME 206 &
ROME 204
W
02:20PM - 03:35PM
and
F
02:20PM - 03:35PM
Topics in U.S. History.  
77062 HIST 3301.81 American Slavery and Its Legacies Erin Chapman PHIL 328 R 11:10AM - 1:00PM
In this seminar we will study both American slavery and the racial legacies it spawned as they continue to play out in U.S. culture, political traditions, and identity formation. We will first consider slavery’s relationship to the ideal of American democracy and the history of slavery as a bedrock institution of U.S. society. We will read books such as Johnson’s Soul by Soul, Roediger’s The Wages of Whiteness, Hartman’s Lose Your Mother, and McElya’s Clinging to Mammy. As we do so, we will consider slavery as a foundational institution within U.S. society and culture and interrogate the widespread influence of notions of race, hierarchy, and social mobility established through slavery that continue to operate in American society. As we conclude, we will take up the question of current claims of “post-race” politics and “post-black” identities and their implications for the ongoing problem of race in the United States. See syllabus
77123 HIST 3301W.10 Cold War in Asia Gregg Brazinsky PHIL 329 R
11:10AM - 01:00PM
Topics in U.S. History.  
75493 HIST 3301W.80 Epidemics in American History Vanessa Northington Gamble ROME B103 MW
12:45PM - 02:00PM
Topics in U.S. History.  
73468 HIST 3322.10 The Modern American Presidency Edward Berkowitz SEH B1270 TR 2:20PM -3:35PM
A look at the lives of the people and their administrations who have served as US Presidents in the twentieth century. The course provides an important window on twentieth century politics. See syllabus
72488 HIST 3332.10 American Foreign Policy since WWII Chris Tudda ROME 459 TR 8:00AM - 9:15AM
This course examines the history of U.S. foreign relations from the final six months of World War II through President Lyndon B. Johnson’s administration. Through lectures, readings (both primary and secondary), class and group discussions, and various multimedia, we will study main events, trends, and patterns of U.S. foreign relations during that critical time in U.S. history. See syllabus
73962 HIST 3333. MV American Foreign Policy since WWII Richard Thornton AMES B205 TR 11:30AM -12:45PM
This course examines the history of U.S. foreign relations from the final six months of World War II through President Lyndon B. Johnson’s administration. Through lectures, readings (both primary and secondary), class and group discussions, and various multimedia, we will study main events, trends, and patterns of U.S. foreign relations during that critical time in U.S. history. See syllabus
77125 HIST 3334.10 The Nuclear Arms Race James Hershberg GELM 608 TR
02:20PM - 03:35PM

Political, military, diplomatic, scientific, and cultural consequences of the advent of nuclear weapons. The development and uses of the atomic bomb during World War II and the course and legacy of the U.S.-Soviet nuclear arms race during the Cold War.

 
77126 HIST 3501.10 African History Post-1800 Jessica Krug GELM 608 MW
12:45PM - 02:00PM
A survey of African history from 1880 to the present.  
77127 HIST 3530W.10 Women in Africa Nemata Blyden MON 351 TR 12:45PM -2:00PM
When you think of an African woman what do you imagine? A woman with a load or bucket on her head and a baby on her back? This course explores themes and issues in the lives of women in Africa historically, focusing on the various roles women played in African societies. Emphasis is placed, as much as is possible, on the perspectives of women, how they have viewed their history and their ongoing struggle for self-determination. See syllabus
77129 HIST 3610.10  China to 1800 Edward McCord MON 251 TR 2:20PM - 3:35PM
This course is a survey of Chinese civilization from its ancient beginnings to the last imperial dynasty. Topics to be examined include the evolution of the imperial Chinese state, the philosophical foundations of Chinese civilization, China's traditional foreign relations, and social and economic transformations. See syllabus
73963 HIST 3614W.MV Writing Modern Chinese History Richard Thornton ACAD 302 TR
01:00PM - 02:15PM
In this seminar students prepare a research paper on selected topics in the history of modern China.  
73965 HIST 3630.10 History of Korea Jisoo Kim MON 251 MW 12:45PM - 2:00PM
This course is a survey of Korean history from the ancient period through contemporary Korea. We will explore some of the key issues such as the complexity of tributary relations in premodern Korea, colonial legacy, national division, the ongoing Cold War, and the possibility of reunification. We will be learning about a wide range of themes from sublime philosophies to bloody wars, from the growth of today’s giant business conglomerates such as Samsung, Hyundai, Kia etc. and to the influence of Korean pop-culture in Asia and beyond. See syllabus
74756 HIST 3701.10 Argentina in Global Context Paula Alonso-Gortari OM 312 TR
12:45PM - 02:00PM
Topics in Latin American History.  
74592 HIST 3801.10 Land and Power in Israel and Palestine Shira Robinson PHIL 329 T
01:10PM - 03:00PM
Topics in Middle Eastern History.  
77130 HIST 3820.10 History of Israel Daniel Schwartz MON 251 TR 3:45PM - 5:00PM
A political, social, and cultural history of modern Israel from the origins of Zionism in the late nineteenth century to the present. It aims to provide students with a deeper grasp of the personalities, events, forces, and structures that have shaped modern Israel through close engagement with major debates pertaining to the subject of the course. We will explore debates in Israel’s history, like those between different streams of Zionism, or between proponents and opponents of a written constitution, or between conflicting visions of Israel as a “Jewish” state. We will also explore debates among historians and sociologists of Israel/Palestine, such as the debate over the 1948 war, or over whether Zionism should be considered a colonial movement. See syllabus
77542 HIST 3830.10 History of Iraq Shaadi Khoury DUQUES 362 TR
12:45PM - 02:00PM
Modern Iraq’s Ottoman background; its incorporation into a world market dominated by Europe, British influence and preconceptions in the creation of Iraq, and the emergence and survival of the Ba’ath dictatorship. Reforms in economic, political, and educational spheres.  
77131 HIST 3840.10  History of Central Asia Muriel Atkin PHIL 111 MW 3:45PM - 5:00PM
This course discusses developments in the history of the five formerly Soviet Central Asian states and Afghanistan times from ancient times to the fall of the USSR and the Taliban. Topics include the role of the region as a crossroads of empires, trade, and ideas, the role of religion in society, challenges of modernization, and the impact of revolutions. See syllabus
GRADUATE COURSES
74574 HIST 6001.80 Soundscapes: Jews & Music Jenna Weissman Joselit 2142 G CONF T 5:10PM - 7:00PM
This interdisciplinary seminar explores the relationship between music and the modern Jewish experience. Drawing on both history and ethnomusicology, it looks at wide range of Jewish musical expression, from liturgy to popular music, and the equally wide range of contexts in which it appears, from the sanctuary to the concert hall and the campfire. See syllabus
72000 HIST 6012.10 Internship in History and Public Policy Christopher Klemek    
Supervised participation in an office or agency concerned with the formulation of public policy; terms of the internship are arranged with the director of the history and public policy program. Enrollment restricted to students in the history and public policy program.  
72150 HIST 6030.10 Issues of History in International Affairs Adam Howard PHIL 109 T
05:10PM - 07:00PM
Although one might find ample evidence that people and governments rarely “learn from history,” the power of history as a legitimizing force is undeniable. Various groups in history have vied to create and control narratives of history that dominate public discourse. This course will examine the various political, social, and cultural techniques that create historical narratives, and will concentrate on three key themes: what is history? the role of history and how it affects relations between states; and how history is used and abused in the present day.  
72290 HIST 6030.11 Issues of History in International Affairs Adam Howard PHIL 108 W
05:10PM - 07:00PM
Although one might find ample evidence that people and governments rarely “learn from history,” the power of history as a legitimizing force is undeniable. Various groups in history have vied to create and control narratives of history that dominate public discourse. This course will examine the various political, social, and cultural techniques that create historical narratives, and will concentrate on three key themes: what is history? the role of history and how it affects relations between states; and how history is used and abused in the present day.  
72634 HIST 6030.12  Issues of History in International Affairs Garret Martin TOMP 206 W 6:10PM - 8:00PM
Although one might find ample evidence that people and governments rarely “learn from history,” the power of history as a legitimizing force is undeniable. Various groups in history have vied to create and control narratives of history that dominate public discourse. This course will examine the various political, social, and cultural techniques that create historical narratives, and will concentrate on three key themes: what is history? the role of history and how it affects relations between states; and how history is used and abused in the present day. See syllabus
77344 HIST 6030.13 Issues of History in International Affairs Hope M. Harrison 1957 E 316 T 5:10PM - 7:00PM
How does history influence current international affairs? How do politicians try to manipulate popular understandings of history? This course considers a variety of cases around the world to answer these questions, including the US, Japan, China, Armenia, Turkey, Germany and others. See syllabus
72149 HIST 6032.10 Reading and Research: Strategy and Policy Robert Angevine MON B36 W 7:10PM - 9:00PM
This course is an introduction to strategic studies from an historical perspective. Military strategy focuses on the preparation and use of military power to serve political ends. The course will examine the evolution of strategic thought with an emphasis on the thinking of Carl von Clausewitz. It will also survey the critical military developments of the last century and highlight several topics of interest to military historians, strategists, and policy practitioners. See syllabus
74631 HIST 6032.11 Reading and Research Seminar: Strategy and Policy J. Furman Daniel MON B36 T
07:10PM - 09:00PM 
This course is an introduction to strategic studies from an historical perspective. Military strategy focuses on the preparation and use of military power to serve political ends. The course will examine the evolution of strategic thought with an emphasis on the thinking of Carl von Clausewitz. It will also survey the critical military developments of the last century and highlight several topics of interest to military historians, strategists, and policy practitioners.  
77133 HIST 6051.10 Reading and Research Seminar: Re-thinking Cold War History James Hershberg PHIL 328 R
04:10PM - 06:00PM
A reading and research course that relies heavily on documents from formerly closed communist archives and recently declassified Western materials. Various issues and events of the Cold War; old and new historiographical controversies. Students write a primary-source research paper to elucidate one of the many aspects of the Cold War about which new evidence is available.  
77134 HIST 6121.10  Reading and Research Seminar: Modern European History Katrin Schultheiss PHIL 301 R
05:10PM - 07:00PM
Reading and Research Graduate Seminar.  
77345 HIST 6135.10 British Imperialism Dane Kennedy PHIL 328 M
07:10PM - 09:00PM
This is a graduate research seminar in British imperial history. Students will be introduced to the historiography on the subject through selected articles that highlight schools of thought and points of debate. At the same time, they will select a research topic that involves the use of primary source material, producing a 25-30 page paper at the end of the semester.  
70225 HIST 6139.10 Folger Institute Seminars II Erin Chapman    
Continuation of HIST 6138. Topics announced in the Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for credit provided the topic differs. Consult the chair of the department before registration.  
77454 HIST 6301.10 Cultural Methods in African American Historiography Erin Chapman PHIL 328 R 6:10PM - 8:00PM
In this graduate readings seminar, we will read historical monographs to explore how scholars have utilized the “new cultural history” as a means to complicate, deepen, and personalize African American history. In doing this, we will also interrogate the usefulness of this methodology in comparison to other historical methods, especially social history, the traditional approach to African American history. African American cultural history includes such themes as popular culture, the construction and reconstruction of race, the formation of social identities and institutions through the dynamic confluence of gender, race, sexuality, and power, and “the personal,” or subjective experience, as an aspect of history. See syllabus
77346 HIST 6304.10 American Indian History to 1890 David Silverman PHIL 328 W
05:10PM - 07:00PM
North American Indian history from indigenous societies on the eve of first contact with Europeans until the conclusion of the Great Plains Wars of the late 19th century.  
77137 HIST 6310.10 Readings in 19th-Century American History Richard Stott PHIL 328 M
04:10PM - 06:00PM
Important trends in historical writing about 19th-century America.  
74146 HIST 6370.80 US Legal History Robert Cottrol SEE DEPT T
03:50PM - 05:50PM
The legal history of the United States from the 17th century to the present. The course examines legal change within the broader context of political, social, and economic change. Admission by permission of instructor. Same as LAW 6591.  
77122 HIST 6470.80 Cityscapes Suleiman Osman P 201 T
02:00PM - 03:50PM
Interdisciplinary examination of the American city, including urban theory, history, planning, architecture, urban politics, and cultural representations of the city. Same as AMST 6470.  
76083 HIST 6495.80 Historic Preservation: Principles and Methods Richard Longstreth P 201 MW
04:10PM - 06:00PM
The scope and purpose of the preservation movement in the United States, with focus on developments since the 1960s. Preservation theories, attitudes toward the past and toward design, the intent and impact of legislation, approaches to documentation, the concept of significance, and preservation as an instrument of change. Same as AMST 6495.  
77139 HIST 6501.10 Atlantic History Jessica Krug PHIL 329 W
04:10PM - 06:00PM
Special Topics in African History.  
77147 HIST 6601.10  The Geo-Politics of Afghanistan, South and Central Asia Benjamin Hopkins OM 208A R 5:10PM - 7:00PM
This 
course 
examines 
the
 history
 of
 Afghanistan’s
 geo‐political 
and
 geo‐strategic
 importance,
 linking
 together 
South 
and
 Central
 Asia.
 
It
 looks 
at
the
 evolution
 of 
the
 modern
 Afghan
 state 
and 
the effects
 of 
imperial,
both
 European
 and
 non‐European,
 processes
 and
 interests
 on
 its
construction.
Through
 Afghanistan’s
 past,
 the
 course 
interrogates 
the
multi‐dimensional
 history
 of
 this
 highly
 interconnected
 region,
 as
 well
 as
critically 
evaluates 
the
 global 
forces
 shaping 
the
 country’s
 story.
Temporally,
 the
 course 
begins
 with 
the
 18th 
century 
and 
continues
 to
present
 day 
events
 which
 affect 
this 
region
 today,
 most
 notably
 the
American‐led
 occupation
 of
 the 
country.
 See syllabus
77148 HIST 6601.11 Human Rights in the Two Koreas Jisoo Kim PHIL 329 M
05:10PM - 07:00PM
Topics in Asian History.  
77149 HIST 6611.10 Readings Seminar: 20th-Century China Edward McCord PHIL 328 T
06:10PM - 08:00PM
Selected topics in the history of modern China from the 1911 Revolution to the Cultural Revolution.  
75533 HIST 6801.10 Readings Seminar: Israel-Palestine Conflict Shira Robinson PHIL 329 T
05:10PM - 07:00PM
Topics in Middle Eastern History.  
77150 HIST 6824.10  Reading and Research Seminar: Modern Iran Muriel Atkin PHIL 328 M 5:10PM - 7:00PM
This course covers the period from roughly 1800 to 1989. Topics to be discusses include the formation of the Iranian state in its modern borders and the threats to its survival as an independent country, evolving political ideas, efforts to bring about change, attitudes toward the West and Islam, the country’s foreign relations and its political upheavals. See syllabus