Hugh Agnew

Hugh Agnew

Title:
Professor of History and International Affairs
Office:
ESIA 412
Address: 1957 E Street, NW
Phone: 202-994-3785
Email:
[email protected]

Hugh Agnew specializes in Central and Eastern Europe, with a focus on modern Czech history. His first book examines a group of intellectuals in late 18th and early 19th century Bohemia whose linguistic, literary and historical studies laid the foundations for the subsequent Czech nationalist movement. His most recent book surveys Czech history in its European setting, from the arrival of the Czechs in Bohemia to the present. Professor Agnew's current research explores the use of symbol and ritual in the Czech nationalist movement, topics on which he has published several preparatory studies, and which will be the theme of his next book. He has appeared on international and local media including CNN, C-SPAN, Czech Television, Voice of America's Czech service, and Radio Prague. Between 2002 and 2016 Professor Agnew served as an associate dean, senior associate dean, and interim dean in the Elliott School of International Affairs. (Complete C.V.)

Education

Ph.D., Stanford University, 1981.

Publications

The Czechs and the Lands of the Bohemian Crown. Stanford, CA: Hoover Institution Press, 2004. Translated into Czech as Češi a zeme Koruny české. Prague: Academia, 2008.

"Symbol and Ritual in Czech Politics in the Era of the `Tábory Lidu.'" In Nacionalismus, společnost a kultura ve střednĺ Evrope 19. a 20. stoletĺ - Nationalismus, Gesellschaft und Kultur in Mitteleuropa im 19. und 20. Jahrhundert: Pocta Jirĺmu Kořalkovi k 75. narozeninám, ed. Jiřĺ Pokorný, Luboš Velek, and Alice Velkov á, 393-408. Prague: Karolinum, 2007.

"The Flyspecks on Palivec's Portrait: Francis Joseph, the Symbols of Monarchy, and Czech Popular Loyalty." In The Limits of Loyalty: Imperial Symbolism, Popular Allegiances, and State Patriotism in the Late Habsburg Monarchy, ed. Laurence Cole and Daniel L. Unowsky, 86-112. New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2007.

"Demonstrating the Nation: Symbol, Ritual and Political Protest in Bohemia, 1867-1875." In The Street as Stage: Protest Marches and Public Rallies since the Nineteenth Century, ed. Matthias Reiss, 85-103. Oxford: Oxford University Press with the German Historical Institute of London, 2007.

"Czechs, Germans, Bohemians? Images of Self and Other in Bohemia to 1848." In Creating the Other: Ethnic Conflict and Nationalism in Habsburg Central Europe, ed. Nancy M. Wingfield, 56-80. New York: Berghahn, 2003.

"New States, Old Identities? The Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Historical Understandings of Statehood." Nationalities Papers 28, no. 4 (2000): 619-650.

"Ambiguities of Ritual: Dynastic Loyalty, Territorial Patriotism, and Nationalism in the Last Three Royal Coronations in Bohemia, 1791-1836." Bohemia: Zeitschrift für Geschichte und Kultur der böhmischen Länder 41, no. 1 (2000): 3-22.

Origins of the Czech National Renascence. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 1993.

Classes Taught

HIST 1011: World History, 1500 to the present
HIST 3173: The Habsburgs in East Central Europe
HIST 3178: The Making of the Modern Balkans
HIST 6170: Eastern European History 1772-1918
HIST 6171: Eastern European History, 1919-1945